Photo rendering the proposed new development

Highrise to replace Coquitlam building burned in fire

Highrise to replace Coquitlam building burned in fire

Photo rendering the proposed new development

Coquitlam council is considering a highrise for the site of a former Burquitlam rental building that burned down last year.

Coun. Bonita Zarrillo said she would not support the application, noting that people who were moved from the burned building to the other strata building were being displaced.

“I’m at the end of feeling good about people losing their homes in buildings,” she said, later adding: “I’m not kicking people out of their homes along the Burquitlam SkyTrain line anymore until we have housing built… I am just done with the wheeling and dealing putting density here and taking it from here. It is not fair. It is not fair to the residents.”

She added that she would like to see a new project adhere to the current zoning for the property instead of the large mixed-use development proposed by Amacon.

Read the whole story at https://www.tricitynews.com/real-estate/a-first-step-for-highrise-to-replace-coquitlam-building-burned-in-fire-1.24089684

Photo from Tri-City News

Letter: Money talks and renters are hurt in Coquitlam

Letter: Money talks and renters are hurt in Coquitlam

Photo from Tri-City News

Letter to Tri-City News by Felix Thijssen, Coquitlam

The Editor,

It seems Bonita Zarrillo is the only city councillor in Coquitlam who has not yet sold out to the breakneck redevelopment of 50-year-old affordable rental complexes. The cost to the human beings living there is of little concern.

Let’s start with deceptive numbers: Yes, 98 existing units will be replaced by 135 new ones, but only 20 of these are “below market” — i.e., affordable. Currently, all 98 are. This proportion holds for all projects in Coquitlam, meaning a huge net loss for affordability.

Read full letter at https://www.tricitynews.com/opinion/letters/letter-money-talks-and-renters-are-hurt-in-coquitlam-1.24022997

Controlling monster houses

The city of Coquitlam will look at implementing neighbourhood-specific zoning to battle concerns about mega homes.

The proliferation of large, new houses has led to a number of complaints from residents, particularly in the city’s older southwest neighbourhoods, who say the new homes are hurting the character of their streets.

(Similar concerns have been raised in Port Moody, which has held discussions on the issue and will host a town hall meeting later this month.)

According to a Coquitlam city staff report, many of the original homes were built in the 1950s and 1960s and did not take “full advantage of the permitted building density.” And when older homes are torn down, they are often replaced by structures that stand out by meeting the maximum floor space ratio allowed under the city’s zoning bylaws.

Balancing the wishes of residents who are comfortable with larger homes with those in older neighbourhoods who believe the megastructures are an eyesore may require more versatility in the city’s zoning regulations, city manager Jim McIntyre told city council Monday.

Original Article from Tri-City News: http://www.tricitynews.com/news/regulating-mega-homes-is-discussed-in-coquitlam-1.1889637

New community plans are too broad

Throughout Burquitlam, construction is booming.

Hammers are pounding and saws are cutting in anticipation of the Evergreen Line, which is set to begin running along North and Clarke roads by summer 2016.

The hurried redevelopment of west Coquitlam has put pressure on the city to update its neighbourhood plan, a blueprint for what Burquitlam will look like in 25 years.

Now, with neighbourhood plans recently adopted for Austin Heights, Maillardville and Burke Mountain’s Partington Creek, as well as the Northwest Burke Visioning Study underway this year, the municipality is set to launch Phase 1 of the Burquitlam-Lougheed Neighbourhood Plan this spring.

The BLNP will be different from the other neighbourhood plans as it will combine two distinct districts of west Coquitlam to focus on the new transit corridor.

Original Article from Tri-City News: http://www.tricitynews.com/news/planning-for-a-new-burquitlam-1.1883249